Bodies, Emotions and Hamlet. Or, why I wrote This Mortal Coil.

This is a guest post by Fay Bound Alberti. Fay is an Honorary Senior Research Fellow in History at Queen Mary University of London, having taught previously at universities throughout the UK, including Manchester, UCL, and Lancaster. A founding member … Continue reading

REVIEW ESSAY: Shakespeare’s emotional turn

Dr Una McIlvenna is Lecturer in Early Modern Literature at the University of Kent. From 2011-2014 she was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow with the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, based at the University of … Continue reading

Violence, vomit, and hysteria: An interview with Rose Reynolds

Shakespeare’s first tragedy, revived by Michael Fentiman for the RSC this summer, is a story of blood, tears, rape, and entrails. From the opening scenes, in which Titus orders the ritual disembowelling of the Goth Queen Tamora’s son, the violence … Continue reading

Excrementitious humours: Crying and not crying in Titus Andronicus

Dr Thomas Dixon is the Director of the Centre for the History of the Emotions at Queen Mary, University of London. Here he writes about the representations of tears and weeping in Shakespeare’s first tragedy. I have been researching the … Continue reading