Colonial Anxiety and Vulnerability in British India

This is a guest post by Mark Condos. Mark obtained both his BA and MA at Queen’s University in Canada. In 2013, he received his PhD from the University of Cambridge, where he worked under the supervision of the late Professor … Continue reading

Farts and Friars, Rebellion and Wrath: A Response to Thomas Dixon

Paul Megna is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow with the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, based at The University of Western Australia. He is currently developing a project on emotion and ethics in medieval and … Continue reading

Translating ‘Anger’ in the Sixteenth Century: A Response to Thomas Dixon (Kind Of)

Kirk Essary is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Meanings Program of the ARC Centre for the History of Emotions at the University of Western Australia. His research at the Centre focuses on conceptions of emotion in sixteenth-century religious thought … Continue reading

Angers past or anger’s past?

Thomas Dixon is Director of the Centre for the History of the Emotions at Queen Mary University of London. His new research – part of the Living With Feeling project – explores the history, philosophy, and experience of anger.   In this, … Continue reading

History of Emotions Blog Round-Up: July-October 2016

After the summer lull, the start of term is always a busy time. In case you’ve missed any blog posts, here’s our second round-up of 2016 (the first was in July). These are listed in chronological order by month of … Continue reading

Meet our PhD Students – Edgar Gerrard Hughes

Edgar Gerrard Hughes starts a PhD in the Centre for the History of the Emotions this week. His research is funded by the Wellcome Trust under our Living with Feeling grant.     I studied history as an undergraduate at Hertford College, … Continue reading

Victorian Emotions: BAVS Talks 2016 (VIDEO)

On 10 May 2016, the British Association of Victorian Studies (BAVS) hosted and filmed four short talks by Victorianists. All four talks are now available to watch on YouTube (and below) and all of them hold potential interest for historians of … Continue reading