Universities should try and teach wisdom, not just knowledge

Should a university provide a moral or spiritual education to its students? The idea seems ridiculous in the age of the mega-university. Universities today are enormous corporations, employing tens of thousands of academics and staff, with anything from 5000 to … Continue reading

Colonial Anxiety and Vulnerability in British India

This is a guest post by Mark Condos. Mark obtained both his BA and MA at Queen’s University in Canada. In 2013, he received his PhD from the University of Cambridge, where he worked under the supervision of the late Professor … Continue reading

How the alt-right emerged from men’s self-help

Like a lot of people, I’ve been scrambling to make sense of the Trump victory and what it says about public attitudes in the US and western culture generally. I’ve spent this week researching the alt-right movement and reading some … Continue reading

Diagnosing Deviance: aversion, obscenity and the senses in classical antiquity

  This guest post by Mark Bradley is part of Disgust Week, in which a group of scholars from a range of disciplines explore different aspects of disgust. Mark Bradley is Associate Professor of Ancient History and Associate Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Education … Continue reading

Disgust and the Jury: “Horrible and Inhuman” Homicides; Beldotti’s Disgust

This extract, the second in our Disgust Week series, is taken from Professor Martha Nussbaum’s Book Hiding from Humanity: Disgust, Shame and the Law (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2004), pp.168-171. The book critiques the roles of disgust and shame in … Continue reading